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Top 7 Fatal Flaws Frequently Found From The Podium

By Sandra Schrift

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Be a speaker of influence - not control or guilt. With the privilege of the platform comes the awesome responsibility of motivating and influencing your audience to feel/think/act differently.

  1. Not starting and stopping on time. Be flexible and be able to cut the talk short if asked. Be in control.

  2. Not dressing appropriately. Always be a step above the audience. If it's business casual, be a little dressier than casual.

  3. Not checking out your room. A/V equipment and seating for any potential problems. Give yourself enough time to make the room right for you.

  4. Not having good platform skills. Knowing your subject is not enough. You must have the ability to excite the audience and keep their interest.

  5. Not having rapport with the audience. Not doing your research to find out what really interests them. You will know that magic moment when the audience is nodding with approval.

  6. Not having enough or too much information. The talk should have substance and knowledge of the client's business.

  7. Not being sensitive to the audience. Do not use ethnic stories or off color remarks. "Politics and religion should be avoided unless you are a member of the clergy."

    POINT: The effectiveness of a talk is whether the audience enjoyed it and found it useful. Did the talk influence their behavior positively and productively once they returned to their personal and professional lives?

Today's Top7Business Article Was Submitted by Coach Sandra Schrift, 13 year owner of a national Speakers Bureau who is now a Career TeleCoach to emerging and experienced professional speakers. Founder of Speakers University sTeleclasses. New class begins August 16 - see website for details and registration. Limited to 25 people http://www.schrift.com Email: coachschrift@juno.com for FREE bi-weekly ezine.

Source: http://Top7Business.com/?expert=Sandra_Schrift

Article Submitted On: August 10, 1999